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Lee Palmer

Lee Palmer is Head of School for Blyth-Templeton Academy and has served as Principal of the Upper School at Sidwell Friends School in Washington, DC, Interim Principal of the Upper School at Trinity School in New York City, Science Chair at the Bryn Mawr School in Baltimore and as a founding board member of the Global Online Academy. Educated at Cornell University (B.S.), Rutgers University (M.S.) and Towson University (Secondary Education), Lee is deeply committed to student-centered, global experiential education.

Recent Posts

Why The Best Private High Schools Are Committed to Inclusion

bullying, inclusive school environment

When we think of education, our minds tend to go to academics and grades. While these are indeed important components, social and emotional skills are equally valuable. Inclusion, a term that you may frequently hear or read about in conversations and articles, describes the practices that create an environment where all students feel socially and emotionally safe.

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Is The Small School Environment a Better Way?

student-centered learning, parents and education

With all the pressure on schools today to meet various performance standards, the needs of individual students can get lost.  As a result, some students are unsuccessful, either dropping out of school, struggling with mental health issues or just not being challenged enough to meet their full potential. This happens not because these students aren't capable, but because it's becoming harder and harder for even the most dedicated teachers to provide each student the support they need to succeed.

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4 Things Parents Should “Unlearn” When it Comes to Education

student-centered learning, parents and education

 In my more than 30 years teaching and leading high schools, I often see parents unknowingly sabotage their own child’s success. They’ve been bombarded with messages that tell them, “the more involved you are in your child’s education, the more they will learn.” It’s not that parent involvement isn’t crucial to success, but many of us are doing it wrong. 

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